Logo

Program Structure

Core Course
Semester One: 15 weeks (Core Courses)
15 Credit
s

 

 

 

Module One: Global Disruptions and Emerging Opportunities  [3 Courses of total 6 Credits]

This module introduces conceptual and analytical tools for comprehending social change and global complexity. Drawing on key elements of social and behavioral sciences – including but not exclusively, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political sciences and development studies, etc. -- the module delivers a multi-disciplinary foundation for understanding humankind, societies and the forces of change that are driving disruption and delivering emergent opportunities across the globe. The module introduces disruptions, global process, new trends, human rights and value aspects of globalization.

  • Course 1 (GS 501): Introduction to Global System

    Course One: GS 501 Title: Introduction to Global System Credit: 2
    Description: This course explores these interconnections and flows of people, information, ideas, technology, money and goods. It examines the physical, technological, economic and legal infrastructures, which makes these flows possible, and analysethe pros and cons. By giving specific attention to global and local players, including State and Non-State actors (civil society, for profit private and public spheres), this course equips students with the ability to see and understand the world and social change from different perspectives. Through this course, students will be able to question and identify the challenges and opportunities that emerge from global interconnection.

     

  • Course 2 (GS 502): The Art and Science of Sustainability

    Course Two: GS 502

    Title: The Art and Science of Sustainability Credit: 2
    Description: The course describes the value and science aspects of sustainability. As global interconnection and resource consumption grows, the environment is increasingly under pressure. This course examines how global and local dynamics intersect to produce environmental change and will assess the effects of these changes on social, political and economic relations. The course gives particular attention to how urgent environmental challenges are being tackled and what opportunities and solutions can be pursued to deliver a sustainable future. The course deals with both scientific, social, and cultural aspects of sustainability.

     

  • Course 3 (GS 503): Disruptive Innovation

    Course Three: GS 503

    Title: Disruptive Innovation Credit: 2
    Description: This course examines the concept of disruptive innovation as a sustainable solution to the complex global challenges.  The students will be introduced to the theory of disruptive innovation and how displacing the common strategies and practices can better respond to societal needs both in the private and public sectors.  Case studies will be employed to demonstrate the impact of disruptive innovation in the creation of new markets in the business arena, as well as expanding and improving public services more inclusively.

     

  • Outcome: Grounded Immersion (Internship or field placement with Capstone)

    Grounded Immersion for the Module One

    Method

     

     

    The students will have a choice of either developing a capstone paper or will be immersed in a real world practical exercise integrating the concepts and issues addressed in all the courses in this module. These capstones will be based on themes identified from the three courses taken during first module. The work duration will be 30 hours with10 hours allocated from each course. Students will be encouraged to work with any organization or business entity to complete the capstone. A combine panel of instructors will assess the students’ final outcomes.

     

  • 1

 

Module Two: Sustainable Design and Implementation [3 Courses of total 6 Credits]

The objective of the second module is to broaden perspectives of the participants, and teach conceptual tools—for problem analysis to better understand social dynamics and empower stakeholders—as well as additional tools for practical application that will be used in selecting, designing, and testing a social innovation.

  • Course 1 (GS 511): Design Thinking

    Course One: GS 511 Title: Design Thinking Credit: 2
    Description: The course provides critical perspective and tools and techniques to the students to achieve sound design. It will also acquaint the participants with social rights, importance of participation, and innovative solutions to the wicked problems by tapping potentials of the groups or communities.  Global citizenship, PLA, SDGs, and human wellbeing are themes that it will cover. Students will be made familiar with ethnographic methods and conceptual tools used to engage in place-based social inquiry. In exploring existing social relations this course not only provides an introduction to research practice necessary in the design thinking, but also sets the stage for social innovation processes.

     

  • Course 2 (GS 512): Seminar on Design Innovation

    Course Two: GS 512 Title: Seminar of Design Innovation Credit: 2
    Description: The course will provide series of key issues in design innovation as well as innovative solutions via the inclusion of diverse perspectives of broad stakeholders that can be used to drive influenced-based change in any context – globally, nationally and locally.  Experts in their respective fields will adopt an interactive framework in delivering the seminar where the students will have an opportunity to engage in a constructive discussion and debate.

     

  • Course 3 (GS513): Managing Designing in a Global Society

    Course Three: GS 513 Title: Managing Design in a Global Society Credit: 2
    Description: Positivity of innovative solution in designing is invariably based on efficient management. The course focuses on the fact that in the complex global scenario designing shall consider multiplicity of events and facts in its functionality. This course includes various driving forces of designing such as regionalization, integration, connectivity and consolidation, which have become an integral part of globalization. The students will examine the region governance, economic integration, migration processes, development, and sustainability.

     

  • Outcome: Grounded Immersion (Internship or field placement with Capstone)

    Second Grounded Immersion for the Module Two

    Method

     

     

    The students will have a choice of either developing a capstone paper or will be immersed in a real world practical exercise integrating the concepts and issues addressed in all the courses in this module. These capstones will be based on themes identified from the three courses taken during first module. The work duration will be 30 hours with10 hours allocated from each course. Students will be encouraged to work with any organization or business entity to complete the capstone. A combine panel of instructors will assess the students’ final outcomes.

     

  • 1

 

Module Three: Designing & Implementing Collaborative Solutions (Skills) [1 Courses of total 3 Credits]

This module will provide the operational tool for developing collaborative solutions. Ideally it is focused on ‘Transforming Boundary Spanning’, hence it will allow the participants designing extraordinary solution or building partnership (designing solution) for complex problem. The designed solution shall address the wicked problems in more innovative fashion where various stakeholders will be brought in the process inclusively. Such implementation of collaborative approach will lead for innovative and sustainable solution. Participants will be placed in an organization for the period of the course. There will be advisor/ mentor from the program to oversee the placement and activities.

  • Course 1 (GS 521): Grounded Immersion (Developing Capstone paper of Practicum)

    Course One: GS 521 Title: Grounded Immersion Credit: 3
    Descriptions:  The field placement will produce the outcome document in a form either of a practicum or a capstone papers. The field experience is considered as a part of the compulsory course with three credits and it will be the third module of 1st semester. Student might select one organization or project to work throughout the period of the third module and develop practicum or capstone paper. They will work under one supervisor, who will be the course coordinator or co-coordinator of GS 621. Students suppose to develop their practicum or capstone paper on the learning outcomes of the courses of the module three.

     

  • 1

 

Specialized Courses
Semester Two: 15 weeks  
Plan A [3 Credits for 1 Common Course + 6 Credits for 2 Methodology Course + 6 Credits Thesis = 15 Credits]
Plan B [3 Credits for 1 Common Courses + 6 Credits for 3 Special Course + 6 Credits for 3 Courses on Track = 15 Credits]

 

Common Course (Skill) [3 Credits]

  • Course 1 (GS 531): Cross-cultural Project Management [Compulsory Elective for Plan A & B Student]

    Course One: GS 531 Title: Cross-cultural Project Management Credit: 3
    Description: This course introduces and strengthens team management skills and examines and tests decision-making tools for social change in a multi-cultural environment. This course will include issues, such as, cross-cultural team building, leadership theory and practice, leadership and social transformation, inter-sectoral leadership, values and ethics. It will also link the change management issues with diverse communities and global trends. In doing so the class will focus on strategic analysis and decision making in a multicultural context. It is expected that the course will allow the participants to learn the intercultural communication, importance of resiliency and adaptability, and improve negotiation and decision making capacities.

     

  • 1

 

Specialized Courses [6 Credits]

Plan A: Methodology [6 Credits]

  • Course 1 A (GS 541): Research Methodologies

    Course 1 A: GS 541 Title: Research Methodologies Credit: 3
    Description: The goal of ‘Research Methodologies’ is to learn how research is being done, and to put that knowledge into practice. Students will learn how to apply a great number of tools and techniques, draw conclusions from the research. It will describe both qualitative and quantitative research, their design, problems and tools to investigate. As a general course on research methodology, it will provide the theoretical and practical explanation about the research, sampling, data collection, field-visit, interviewing, details about ethical issues, questionnaires, data analysis and other relevant issues. It is expected that this course will enable the participants to take advance research with sound technical knowledge about methodology.

     

  • Course 2 A (GS 542): Practical Approach to Research Methods

    Course 2 A: GS 542 Title: Practical Approach to Research Methods Credit: 3
    Description: This course draws an existing face-to-face interaction, is designed to prepare students to undertake empirical work. Sessions covered orienting topics such as the formulation of questions and the design of research projects, as well as introducing a series of research techniques including interviewing and observation. Materials from research methods texts describing these approaches will be used for course readings. Speakers are to present examples of empirical research to illustrate approaches, and students will be given access to dissertations as examples of research work. The assessment takes place in the form of a research proposal, proposing a topic and the methods through which it would be studied, typically linked to the thesis that students would undertake.

     

  • 1

 

Plan B: Special Course for Track [6 Credits]

  • Course 1 B (GS 551): Environmental and Social Impact Assessments

    Course One B: GS 551 Title: Environmental & Social Impact Assessments Credit: 2
    Description: This course will provide critical understanding about the different impact assessment tools to be included in a planning process that aims to predict and evaluate the impact of a proposed project, program or policy prior to its commencement. It will examine the technical and policy issues involved in the production and the appraisal of both environmental impact assessments (EIA) and social impact assessment. The course will focus on the ecology of human societies and the social impact of development on communities and regions. The course will provide the students with a "big picture" of what human ecology and social impact are about from an interdisciplinary point of view. This learning process will help to generate a new appreciation for the complex world in which we live.

     

  • Course 2 B (GS 552): Behavioral Economics and Sustainability

    Course Two B: GS 552 Title: Behavioral Economics and Sustainability Credit: 2
    Description: The course will introduce students to the basic concept of Behavior Economics and how this may lead to individual practices for a sustainable society.  Case studies will be used as the main learning tools to examine successful interventions that adopted behavior economics to gear people toward decision making for the greater goods over own individual interests and benefits.

     

  • Course 3 B (GS 553): Disruptive Leadership and Social Transformation

    Course Three B: GS 553 Title: Disruptive Leadership and Social Transformation Credit: 2
    Description:  The world is changing at a rapid pace and likely to increase exponentially in the 4th Industrial Revolution.  Leaders working in this environment face multifaceted disruptive forces and require a set of skills beyond the common competencies in communication, decision making, and leadership.  This course will equip the students with skills that will enable them to embrace the disruptive forces by challenging the status quo and develop a mindset to create impact not only within the organization but the social order to become a responsive and responsible leader.

     

  • 1

 

Track Courses

Track One (Sustainability Development) [6 Credits]
This track will provide tools and techniques on holistic sustainable approach. In addition to the introduction of the complexities of issues related to sustainability the track would enable students to achieve sustainability in both the public and private landscape. The students will be actively engaged in a perspective of sustainability in various organizations in a real-life context to get practical knowledge on the sustainability management. Ideally it will allow the students to develop the competencies to prepare sustainability reports, sustainable planning and assessments.

  • Course 1 B (GS 561): Contemporary Sustainability Issues

    Course One B: GS 561 Title: Contemporary Sustainability Issues Credit: 2
    Description: Sustainability has become a significant force in today’s global development, respective of the transformation in environment, economic, social and political order.  All nations pledged to adopt the UN Social Development Goals in their national development policy.  Mechanisms are in placed to transcend this mission to the business sector.   This course will introduce a wide range of issues that are being addressed to achieve sustainability in both the public and private landscape, such as, climate change in today’s global leadership, resources scarcity, income disparity, cyber security, sustainability regulation in the business sector, the carbon economy, etc.

     

  • Course 2 B (GS 562): Sustainability Management

    Course Two B: GS 562 Title: Sustainability Management Credit: 2
    Description: Sustainability is defined as “the capability of an organization to transparently manage its responsibilities for environmental stewardship, social well-being, and economic prosperity over the long term while being held accountable to its stakeholders.” This course focuses on a wide range of local organizations that are seeking to become sustainable and contribute to the sustainability of the community and perhaps their “parent” organizations. Think globally – act locally! The students will be actively engaged in a perspective of sustainability in organizations in a real-life context through weekly discussions, in order to learn how sustainability works and how it transforms the way the organizations operate and thrive over the long term.

     

  • Course 3 B (GS 563): Society, Innovation and Sustainable Development

    Course Three B: GS 563 Title: Society, Innovation and Sustainable Development Credit: 2
    Description: The course focuses on the collaborative economy (also commonly referred to as the ‘sharing economy’), its disrupting business models and collaborative principles in ways that are set to change industries from food to banking to professional services. It allows learning about the best-known examples of start-ups and ventures in the space of innovation and sustainable development such as Uber, The Food Assembly, Transferwise and UpCounsel and the impact they have on the foundations of society and sustainable development.

     

  • 1

 

Track Two (Design for Innovation) [6 Credits]
Students are expected to gain knowledge and tools for various design innovation. It will help to meet the challenge of 21stcentury knowledge based society where smart planning will help to address ever growing complex challenges. Students will become fluent in the many nuanced aspects of design including: service design, UX/Interaction design, systems design, product design and human-centered design for innovation among others. This track will help students to be equipped with design tools in a train-the-trainer format across a series of workshop style classrooms with real-world case studies. 

  • Course 1 B (GS 571): Design Innovation

    Course One B: GS 571 Title: Design Innovation Credit: 2
    Description: This course is a hands-on project-based course focused on building hard skills that can be applied and leveraged to respond to rapidly changing job markets and global society. Students will become fluent in the many nuanced aspects of design including: service design, UX/Interaction design, systems design, product design and human-centered design for innovation among others. This course is based in real-world practice, yet students will be exposed to various methodologies and approaches culled from dynamic centers of subject matter expertise from around the world.

     

  • Course 2 B (GS 572): Design Skills for Projects

    Course Two B: GS 572 Title: Design Skills for Projects Credit: 2
    Description: This course is a dive deep into the personal and cultural leadership essentials required to implement effective innovation and design thinking initiatives. Students will explore transferable tools and contemporary conversations about the opportunities and challenges of driving change in the 21st century. This course will specifically focus on internal and external dimensions for design and innovation leadership including: the role of self-awareness and empathy, creative innovation mindsets, effective facilitation methods to unlock insights among stakeholders, creative confidence, and project management for complex organizational systems (from hyper-local to globally distributed teams). Students will gain a sharpened set of strategic skills and insights ready for immediate application to their daily life at work and home.

     

  • Course 3 B (GS 573): Design for Impact and Disruption

    Course Two B: GS 573 Title: Design for Impact and Disruption Credit: 2
    Description: Designers can contribute to the social and environmental challenges.  In this course, the students will be exposed to and applied methods that are utilized to expand creative possibilities in products, services and systems in a responsible manner.  Students will be equipped with design tools in a train-the-trainer format across a series of workshop style classrooms with real-world case studies.

     

  • 1
 

Track Three (Business Management Innovation) [6 Credits]
The business management innovation track is focused on the corporate and non-corporate finance issues, theory, frameworks and challenges. Since the business issues are internationally applicable and focus on various countries’ sustainable and responsible investment approaches this track is expected to equip students with innovation application tools and techniques. This track will also focus on the concept of CSR and its evolving features in the business sector as well as application for the betterment of the larger society. Finally this course will emphasize on ethical decision making in business.

  • Course 1 B (GS 581): Strategic Investment

    Course One B: GS 581 Title: Strategic Investment Credit: 2
    Description: The course will explain the corporate and non-corporate finance theory and frameworks those are internationally applicable and focus on various countries’ sustainable and responsible investment approaches. Case studies will be used explore the major differences in sustainable performance measurement, financial structuring, and corporate governance systems in major economic blocks leading to the development of students’ own views on how corporations achieve a balance (or not) between social and environmental objectives alongside financial objectives. The course will also develop skills and confidence to understand and challenge finance experts, particularly when questioning the balance of financial returns and returns to other stakeholders. There will be components on behavioural finance and corporate governance issues impact business-financing decisions in current corporate finance transactions. It will also focus on evaluating alternative investment and funding options. The course will also consider responsible investment – the integration of ESG issues into investment evaluation.  Including or excluding companies, partnering with stakeholders and evaluating ESG factors, whilst still aiming for a good return, can raise multiple and complex questions.

     

  • Course 2 B (GS 582): Reengineering CSR

    Course Two B: GS 582 Title: Reengineering CSR Credit: 2
    Description: CSR assumes many forms from shared value, social and corporate governance (ESG), corporate citizenship, ethical corporation and etc. It has a significant role in sustainability in a globalized world not only within the organization but extends to national context and beyond.  This course will trace how the concept of CSR has evolved and adopted in the business sector as well as viewed by society at large.  This course will explore how CSR can fulfill its landscape in the sustainability arena for the greater goods among practioners in private sector, government and non-governmental organization.

     

  • Course 3 B (GS 583): Ethical Decision Making

    Course Three B: GS 583 Title: Ethical Decision Making Credit: 2
    Description: Poor moral judgment can ruin a manager's career. It can even sink an entire company. Accordingly, in today's volatile and fiercely competitive business environment, a manager must possess not only technical and communication skills. He or she must also be able to identify and effectively resolve ethical issues that inevitably arise in the pursuit of business (and career) objectives. That is, a manager must be able to make business decisions that are defensible ethically as well as economically. This course is designed to enhance students' skills in moral reasoning as it applies to managerial decision-making. This course will also include issues of ethics and corporate culture. In many cases, the unethical behavior is due in part to a "toxic" corporate culture. The attitudes, values, and practices that prevail in the organizations induce otherwise ethical employees to take actions that violate widely shared norms of conduct. The course will bring concepts of behavior, its impact and alternative to the attitude of "only results matter,".

     

  • 1

 

Skill Course [Elective Course]

  • Course 1 (GS 532): Communication for Innovating

    Course One : GS 532 Title: Communication for Innovation Credit: 2
    Description: This course will examine the relationships between communication and innovation and highlights the importance of communication as a precursor to innovation and sustainable change. The course will also structure the principles of communications and relate with the global changes. In a specific way, it will link with marketing and entrepreneurship while emphasizing the techniques and principles of human relations, leadership and business communication both oral and written and new communication tools. Through the use of active learning tools, students will enhance their skills in communicating the designing processes to their stakeholders including the skills in conversations.

     

  • Course 2 (GS 533): Digital and Social Media Strategies

    Course Two : GS 533 Title: Digital & Social Media Strategy Credit: 2
    Description: Digital/social platforms present firms with enormous opportunities for creating and enhancing value for both themselves and stakeholders such as customers. How these communications technologies can – and should – be used for strategic value-generating purposes, however, is not straightforward. This course grapples with this challenge, with the primary aim being to help students understand how to unlock the value in digital/social platforms across a variety of business contexts and for a number of markedly different purposes. The role that digital/social platforms can play goes well beyond marketing, or as a new vehicle for (or substitute to) advertising. Thus, this is not, strictly speaking, a “marketing” course. Rather, it is a course about how digital and social media can be used to enhance business value.

     

  • Course 3 (GS 534): Managing the Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy

    Course Three : GS 534 Title: Managing the Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy Credit: 2
    Description: The course includes the management of Nonprofit Sector. Managing an NGO is an especially challenging endeavor as it requires not only interpersonal skills to deal with a wide range of people (stakeholders), but it also requires a broad knowledge of how communities and society work. It is not just about doing good, but also making sure actions do not cause unintended consequences and the organization remains sustainable. This course will give you and overview of the many facets an NGO manager must face each day. The course is divided into two basic sections: Theory and Practice. Theory will cover a broad range of topics to give you a firm understanding of how things go wrong, the different sectors in society, how managers prioritize requests on their time and resources (stakeholder theory), and lastly how to apply business planning to an NGO.

     

  • Course 4 (GS 535): Storytelling for Impacts

    Course Four : GS 535 Title: Storytelling for Impact Credit: 2
    Descriptions:  Storytelling is well recognized as an effective communication tool that can create the impact envisioned.  Persuasive storytelling is an art as well as a craft.  This form of communication sets individuals and ventures apart from others in the playing field.  It has become an important skill set both in the social and business sectors.  In this interactive course, the students will learn the structures and techniques of storytelling through crafting verbal, visual, and written stories.

     

  • Course 5 (GS 536): Dialogue for Collaborative Progress

    Course Five : GS 536 Title: Dialogues for Collaborative Progress Credit: 2
    Description:  Creating change that disrupts the status quo may pose challenges in leveraging its influence among key stakeholders.  Communicating the outcomes and their impact requires a set of skills beyond the common communication techniques. This course will equip the students with negotiation techniques in order to engage in effective dialogues with stakeholders.   Through the use of verbal communication, problem solving and interpersonal skills, the students will learn to be an effective influencer.  Adopting active learning tools, the students will develop negotiation skills across different scenarios.

     

  • 1

Thesis A (Half of the thesis registration) [6 Credit]
Thesis (GS 591): Thesis

 

Summer (8 Weeks)

 

Options Credit
Study Plan A [Research (thesis)]* Register 6 Credits in Summer [Total 12 Credits]
Study Plan B [Track (IS or Project)] 6 Credits

 

* Can be extended up to 3 more academic years depending on the progress of the research.