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Curriculum Students Year 2015-2017 (Registration No. 58-60)

 

GSSE curriculum requires 136 credits to graduate at the minimum of 4 years of studies. The curriculum is divided into 8 modules of learning (1 module/semester) designed to foster the changemaker within you. For the last 2 modules of learning in your senior year, you will have the opportunity to choose your minors, which are:

1. Intervention & Social Innovation 
2. Advocacy & Social Innovation
3. Technology & Social Innovation

GSSE Learning Modules

  • 1. Foundations

    Year 1 Semester 1

    GS202
    GS201
    TU100
    TU101
    TU102
    TU104

     

    Understanding Human Communications
    Foundations of Academic Writing
    Civic Education
    Thailand, ASEAN, World*
    Social Life Skills*
    Critical Thinking, Reading & Writing*

    Co-Curricular Activities
    Passion Finding

     

  • 2. People & Communities

    Year 1 Semester 2

    GS200
    GS210
    GS211
    GS215
    GS340
    TU105
    TU106

    Applied Critical Thinking
    People, Groups & Networks
    Social Inquiry & Assessment
    Case: People Communities
    Social Innovation Project 1
    Communication Skills in English*
    Creativity and Communication*

    Co-Curricular Activities
    Presentation and Digital Technology Skills

     

  • 3. Societies & Governance

    Year 2 Semester 1

    GS212
    GS225
    GS231
    GS220
    TU103

    Econ for Social Entrepreneurs (elective)
    Case Study: Society & Governance
    Intro to Human Security
    Philosophy and Religion for Global Citizenship
    Integrated Science & Sustainability*
    Required Electives (Choose 1 course: 3 credits)

    Co-Curricular Activities
    Intro to International Organization/ Forum

     

  • 4. Globalization

    Year 2 Semester 2

    GS230
    GS232
    GS233
    GS235
    GS341
    GS236
    or
    AS125

    Intro To Global Studies
    Globalization Flow 1
    Globalization Flow 2
    Case Study: Globalization
    Social Innovation Project 2.2
    Psychology of Global Organization
    (ElectiveCourse of General Education: Part 2)
    Intro to ASEAN

    Co-Curricular Activities
    Global Health

     

  • 5. Social Innovation

    Year 3 Semester 1

    GS240
    GS241
    GS242
    GS244
    GS250
    GS251

    Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    Human Centered Design for Social Innovation
    Idea Generating Methods
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
    Planning & Management
    Integrated Acct Principles

    Co-Curricular Activities

     

  • 6. Managing Social Innovation

    Year 3 Semester 2

    GS243
    GS245
    GS252
    GS255
    GS324

    Communication as Innovation
    Foundations of Leadership
    Financial Management Social Enterprise
    Case Study: Managing Social Innovation
    Social Innovation Project 2

    Required Elective
      Co-Curricular Activities

     

  • 7. Social Innovation Minors

    Year 4 Semester 1

    GS253

    GS260
    GS261
    GS262

    Social Entrepreneurship & Venture Management**
    Minor: Interventions and Social Innovation
    Designing Organizations
    The Private Sector and Social Innovation
    Introduction to Social Brands


    GS270
    GS271
    GS272

    Minor: Advocacy and Social Innovation
    Power, Strategy and Social Change
    Global Context of Advocacy
    Intro to Community Organizing


    GS280
    GS281
    GS282
    XXxxx
    or GS594

    Minor: Technology and Social Innovation
    Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    Digital Economy and Social Innovation
    Technology for Developing Countries
    Free Elective
    Special Topics Global Studies and Social Innovation 1

     

  • 8. Social Innovation Minors

    Year 4 Semester 2

    GS343
    GS593
    XXxxx
    or GS595

    Social Innovation Project 4
    Professional Development 4
    Free Elective
    Special Topics Global Studies and Social Innovation 2


    GS263
    GS264

    Minor: Interventions and Social Innovation
    Sustainable Transformations
    Design Thinking for Public Social Services


    GS273
    GS274

    Minor: Advocacy and Social Innovation
    Media Advocacy
    Advocacy in Government Relations


    GS283
    GS284

    Minor: Technology and Social Innovation
    Technology for Developing Countries
    Designing for Science

     

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Course Descriptions

Throughout your study at GSSE, you will experience a broad range of subjects, enlisted below.

Types of Courses  Credits Required

General Education Courses

Project Courses

Major Courses

Minor Courses

1. Intervention & Social Innovation (GS260-264)
2. Advocacy & Social Innovation (GS270-274)
3. Technology & Social Innovation (GS280-284)

Required Electives

Free Electives

30

30

49

15



 

6

6

Total Credits 136

Project Courses

  • GS215: Case Study: People and Communities

    2 credits | Year 1

    Case studies on people and communities provide students the opportunity not only to apply their knowledge and skills from the "people and communities module" to new settings and situations, but also illustrate the interconnectedness of the various theories and concepts taught in people and communities courses.

  • GS225: Case Study: Society and Governance

    2 credits | Year 2

    Case study on society and governance provide students the opportunity not only to apply their knowledge and skills from the "society and governance module" to new settings and situations, but also illustrate the interconnectedness of the various theories and concepts taught in people and communities courses.

  • GS235: Case Study: Globalization

    2 credits | Year 2

    Case study on globalization provide students the opportunity not only to apply their knowledge and skills from the "globalization module" to new settings and situations, but also illustrate the interconnectedness of the various theories and concepts taught in globalization courses.

  • GS255: Case Study: Managing Social Innovation

    2 credits | Year 3

    Case study in managing Social Innovation provide students the opportunity not only to apply their knowledge and skills from the "management module" to new settings and situations, but also illustrate the interconnectedness of the various theories and concepts taught in management courses.

  • GS340: Social Innovation Project 1

    3 credits | Year 1

    Students study the way social innovation is designed and implemented, and understand its positive impact on society and its economy. Social innovation functions through various Project are categorized under different areas such as: social innovation Project; social venture management; social system design Project; technology design Project; and advocacy Project. Students work on Project in a staged fashion throughout the education program starting with simple small scale Project. The assessment criteria are 'S' for Satisfactory or 'U' for Unsatisfactory)

  • GS341: Social Innovation Project 2

    3 credits | Year 2

    Students study the way social innovation is designed and implemented, and understand its positive impact on society and its economy. Social innovation functions through various Project are categorized under different areas such as: social innovation Project; social venture management; social system design Project; technology design Project; and advocacy Project. Students work on Project in a staged fashion throughout the education program with simple middle scale Project. (The assessment criteria are 'S' for Satisfactory or 'U' for Unsatisfactory)

  • GS342: Social Innovation Project 3

    3 credits | Year 3

    Students study the way social innovation is designed and implemented, and understand its positive impact on society and its economy. Social innovation functions through various Project are categorized under different areas such as: social innovation Project; social venture management; social system design Project; technology design Project; and advocacy Project. Students work on Project in a staged fashion throughout the education program with simple bigger scale Project. (The assessment criteria are 'S' for Satisfactory or 'U' for Unsatisfactory)

  • GS343: Social Innovation Project 4

    3 credits | Year 4

    Students study the way social innovation is designed and implemented, and understand its positive impact on society and its economy. Students work on Project in a staged fashion throughout the education program gradually increasing complexity of Project in terms of the challenges posed and skills required contributes to students' professional development portfolio. (The assessment criteria are 'S' for Satisfactory or 'U' for Unsatisfactory)

  • GS440/441/442: Community-Based Learning Initiative 1-3

    2 credits | Summer Year 1-3

    Most important is the community placement. The bulk of the course is built around living within a community or working with an agency, interest group, or non-governmental organization (NGO). Students and hosts will be required to abide by a "Learning Conduct Agreement". The position is unpaid.

  • GS590/591/592: Professional Development 1-3

    1 credit | Summer Year 1-3

    The portfolio serves as the culminating work documenting and assessing a year-1 students' acquisition of knowledge and professional competencies attained throughout the academic program of study via coursework, Case studies, learning Project, and community-based learning experiences. Knowledge and professional competencies are integrated into all portfolio products. The following products are components of the portfolio: a resume listing attained learning experiences; a matrix displaying sources for acquisition of competencies; a personal statement on philosophy, values and education goals; a career development plan; and a chronological collection of reflections on learning.

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Major Courses

  • GS200: Questioning Minds: Applied Critical Thinking

    2 credits | year 1

    In this course, students will enhance their critical thinking and creative problem thinking skills to better understand the cognitive processes necessary to examine issues of globalization, human wellbeing and social innovation. Students will practice some of the most central and important skills of critical thinking and focus on applying those strategies to understand current issues, belief systems and ethical positions as well as to analyse media, the current socio-political environments and their own beliefs and moral inclinations. They will also learn how to analyse information and influences, discuss controversial topics intelligently, and construct well-reasoned arguments on a variety of topics.

  • GS201: Foundations of Academic Writing

    2 credits | Year 1

    This course aims to transform the complexity of academic writing into its essentials and to provide undergraduate students with an insight into what is required and how to achieve these requirements using a methodical and effective approach. The course covers essential topics such as: planning; structure; style; code of ethics in writing; methods of citation, quotation and referencing; the anatomy of an argument; and lastly the writing process itself.

  • GS202: Understanding Human Communications

    2 credits | Year 1

    The main goal of the course Understanding Human Communication is to provide students with the insights and skills to succeed in our changing world. Case studys present real-life communication challenges on the job, in school, and in personal relationships. The course considers the changing world of communication, including demographic and cultural influences and ways in which technologies have created both new opportunities and challenges.

  • GS210: About People, Groups and Networks

    3 credits | Year 1

    In this course students explore social constructs at personal, group and network levels and the reciprocal social interactions influencing acts of persons and groups. Throughout the course, students work to define what community means, explore the implications of globalization, and analyse their own social standpoint as global citizens.

  • GS211: Social Inquiry and Assessment

    3 credits | Year 1

    This course will engage students in community-based enquiry Project on health and social and community development. These Project have been identified by community-based organizations with which the School of Global Studies (SGS), through its Thammasat Initiative for Social Innovation (TISI).

  • GS230: Introduction to Global Studies

    3 credits | Year 2

    This course provides an introduction to the emerging trans-disciplinary field of Global Studies. Historical and sociological processes - such as international trade and migration and technological developments. Students will learn about the changing nature of relations between the local and the global, and about key principles of the way that global politics is ordered: including its key aims (power, order, security, justice) and its agents (nation-states, international society, global civil society).

  • GS231: Introduction to Human Security

    3 credits | Year 2

    The course will introduce students to the intellectual foundations of and debates on the concept of human security; and the various aspects of human security such as: political, economic, environmental, food, health, personal, and community security; as well how forces and processes of globalization have an impact on aspects of human security.

  • GS232: Globalization Flows 1

    2 credits | year 2

    This course focuses on international organisations, on national and regional migration policies, on the structuring of life spaces of migrants and refugees and on transnational social dynamics of patterning mobility. It aims at shedding light on the migratory phenomenon at different scales. Global health issues and emphasizes the potential of intervention to improve human life across the globe. The course offers an up-to-date picture of global health covering specific topics such as: communicable and non-communicable diseases, epidemics and pandemics, health inequalities, and how globalization impacts cross-border distribution of disease including public health and political dimensions of global health.

  • GS233: Globalization Flows 2

    2 credits | year 2

    International agreements, trade and population wellbeing. These will include organizational setting(s) and mandates, and interplay of technical, political, social and economic factors in negotiating and implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The course will examine the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO), its policy relationship to other UN agencies and the implications of WTO Agreements on human security and social protection.

  • GS236: Psychology of Global Organizations

    2 credits | year 2

    Survey of organizational psychology with a focus on issues in global organizations.

  • GS240: Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    2 credits | year 3

    The field of social innovation and entrepreneurship and introduces students to several helpful frameworks that will be used in subsequent courses. Students will examine key concepts in their historical context, understand current theories and debates about social change, and discuss Case studies of social entrepreneurs.

  • GS241: Human Centred Design for Social Innovation

    3 credits | year 3

    This course is a practical, experience-based introduction to human centred design-thinking tools and techniques for social innovation and social entrepreneurship. Students will be exposed to applied research, ideation and problem-solving tools adapted from human-centred design and architecture. Using Thammasat Initiative for Social Innovation (TISI) as a laboratory and working with local partners.

  • GS242: Making Innovation Happen: Idea Generation

    3 credits | year 3

    The course is based on a process model which consists of seven phases: project focus, learning about the users, analysis, idea and concept development, concept testing, the communication of results and impact measurement.

  • GS243: Communication as Innovation

    3 credits | year 3

    The course examines both theory and application involved in using communications media as a tool for addressing political, social, and economic development issues. It utilizes a case study approach to look at localized applications of traditional and new communications tools in the pursuit of social innovation.

  • GS244: Corporate Social Responsibility

    2 credits | year 3

    This course aims to develop student's understanding of general theoretical knowledge of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Students are expected to appreciate the importance and challenges of CSR through examination and critical analysis of contemporary CSR issues in the context of globalization with a balanced stakeholder perspective.

  • GS245: Foundations of Leadership

    2 credits | year 3

    This foundation course explores leadership theories, the application to leadership and current issues, as well as critical and self-reflection on one's own leadership qualities. The course utilizes a wide range of adult learning methodologies to provide an opportunity for students to further enhance and apply their knowledge of leadership, while practicing the skills necessary for effective leadership and engaging in the subject of leadership with others.

  • GS250: Planning and Managing Innovative Project

    3 credits | year 3

    Rationale, context, and methods of planning, appraising and evaluating social innovation Project and programmes. Project and programmes are widely used when attempting to allocate limited resources for specific development purposes as effectively as possible, and a core part of the course is on methods for appraising the financial and economic efficiency of social innovation Project.

  • GS251: Integrated Accounting Principles

    3 credits | year 3

    The course will examine accounting for service, merchandising business, manufacturing business and for corporation's models. Students will develop business plans and use accounting information for decision making, record transactions, prepare financial statements and perform ratio analysis.

  • GS252: Financial Management

    3 credits | year 3 | Prerequisite: Have earned credits of GS251

    This course focuses on the flow of cash through the social enterprise as the foundation for understanding the basics of accounting and finance. The course explores the sourcing, including philanthropy, and conservation of the financial resources the firm needs to be successful. Students, who have no background in accounting and finance, will explore the practical business implications gained from financial statements (e.g. financial analysis and valuation of assets) and will learn how to manage the firm's finances, including risk and return management, to create the best possibility for long-term success. At the end of the course, they will develop a three year financial plan for a start-up social venture (including cost capital and capital budget) and determine how to garner the resources needed to start the venture.

  • GS253: Social Entrepreneurship and Venture Management

    3 credits | year 3 | Prerequisite: Have earned credits of GS252

    Recognising the increasing crucial role of the international dimension. Key questions addressed include: Opportunities and challenges do entrepreneurs face (or create) in the international arena? How can these opportunities and challenges be managed creatively and effectively? These questions are addressed from both economic and behavioural perspectives. An emphasis is placed on: the processes of innovation and entrepreneurship; identifying opportunities; planning for and managing a growing venture in the international marketplace from a variety of functional perspectives; and developing an entrepreneurial mind-set. Central to this course is the integration of theory and practice. Underpinned by reflective learning the course builds on previous courses, through student participation in case analyses, experiential exercises, project work, and seminars with practitioners.

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Minor Courses

  • GS260: Designing Organizations

    3 credits | year 4 | Interventions and Social Innovation minor

    A key concern is to examine various change management tools, techniques and ideas and assess their usefulness. Specific topics examined include: some psychological aspects of management; organizational aspects of change; cultural change; systems change; networks; restructuring; communication; continuous improvement; and managing change effectively. A major theme is to develop the ability to generate innovative solutions to problematic systems and to manage change more strategically.

  • GS261: The Private Sector and Social Innovation

    3 credits | year 4 | Interventions and Social Innovation minor

    Students are introduced to a model where corporate success and social wellbeing are interdependent. The same passion, energy and culture of innovation that make a particular company successful can also be used to make a profound and positive social impact in the world.

  • GS262: Introduction to Social Brands

    3 credits | year 4 | Interventions and Social Innovation minor

    Students will employ design methods to conceive of and visualize their own creative proposals for how the Thammasat Initiative for Social Innovation (TISI) itself might engage with the world in new ways. Teams will ultimately pitch their final concepts to a panel of marketing experts and the director of TISI for consideration, feedback and potential real-world implementation.

  • GS263: Sustainable Transformations

    3 credits | year 4 | Interventions and Social Innovation minor

    This case study-based course combines design thinking processes, behavioural sciences, and elements of diffusion theory. Tools and theories introduced in course will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create value on environmental, societal, and economic fronts.

  • GS264: Design Thinking for Public Social Services

    3 credits | year 4 | Interventions and Social Innovation minor

    The course will explore the challenges of fostering innovations in governance from both sides of the formal institutional divide. Before embarking on their design challenges, students will also re-visit governance from a theoretical and empirical perspective, enabling them to see how design thinking complements the analytical and policy approaches already being employed. Need-finding work in local communities will be essential and students have the opportunity to discuss with service users.

  • GS270: Power, Strategy and Social Change

    3 credits | year 4 | Advocacy and Social Innovation minor

    This course prepares students to think strategically about advocacy methods, leverage points, and resources for change. Students focus on the nature of power in its various forms (electoral power, issue framing, financial, citizen mobilization, public opinion) and explore how power and resources can be acquired, evaluated, mobilized, and deployed in the service of promoting a policy agenda. Students develop an understanding of the leverage points for achieving social change, using Case studies to become familiar with legislative processes, the budget cycle, the electoral arena, the regulatory system, public interest law, labour relations, procurement, and the various paths to influencing public opinion and decision makers. By the end of the course students develop a strategy for conducting a campaign for issue advocacy or political change.

  • GS271: Global Context of Advocacy

    3 credits | year 4 | Advocacy and Social Innovation minor

    This course teaches advocacy and social action to promote social justice for disadvantaged groups. The context of advocacy work within the welfare state and a range of strategies are explored. Global Context of Advocacy is both a theoretical and a practical course: it teaches students to critique social movements and the different concepts of the welfare state they correspond to, and to advocate for social change.

  • GS272: Introduction to Community Organizing

    3 credits | year 4 | Advocacy and Social Innovation minor

    The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to community organizing; specifically, the knowledge, skill and value base underpinning community organizing, planning, development and change. It emphasizes the myriad roles, goals, and strategies used by community organizers in effecting social change.

  • GS273: Media Advocacy

    3 credits | year 4 | Advocacy and Social Innovation minor

    Theories of media, social change, and advocacy as well as case studies of media makers who intervene in the process of social change. Through Case studies and readings that place forms of media advocacy in historical context, A core component of the class will be to critically consider the possibilities and limitations for advocacy efforts brought about by transformations in media technology and culture, particularly those related to new media technology, digitization, and globalization.

  • GS274: Advocacy in Government Relations

    3 credits | year 4 | Advocacy and Social Innovation minor

    The course provides hands-on, applied learning that will enable students to advocate and lobby effectively on behalf of specific constituencies, and also as part of broader coalitions (social movements) for change.

  • GS280: Science, Technology and Society

    3 credits | year 4 | Technology & Social Innovation minor

    This course surveys the history of technology, innovation and social innovation in both industrial and emerging countries, by investigating the evolution and diffusion of technical and social innovation, students will learn how science and technology fits into the bigger picture; i.e. how they develop, and how they are related to social forces, cultural values, economic possibilities and political influences. This course has three objectives: to familiarize students with the core ideas about technology shaping social change, to provide insight into the operational practices and strategies employed by social innovators, and to learn from real world innovators to document best practices and create resources required for effective social innovation in emerging communities.

  • GS281: Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    3 credits | year 4 | Technology & Social Innovation minor

    This course introduces students to the social, ethical and policy implications of information technology by focusing on the human impact of information systems and their unintended consequences.

  • GS282: Digital Economy and Social Innovation

    3 credits | year 4 | Technology & Social Innovation minor

    The aim of this course is to provide students with a new orientation and way of thinking to organise and lead sustainable development (e.g. human development in which resource use aims to meet human needs while ensuring the sustainability of natural systems and the environment), through social innovation and entrepreneurship making reflected use of new opportunities of the digital economy.

  • GS283: Technology for Developing Countries

    3 credits | year 4 | Technology & Social Innovation minor

    This course studies meaningful ways to use advanced technologies to support developing communities worldwide. What are the economic and social contexts in developing communities, How technology is currently be used for sustainable development? What new technology research is needed? Because of the nature of the subject, this course will be broad and interdisciplinary. It will cover the basics of technology, economics, and policy, and expect students to explore specific areas of interest in depth on their own.

  • GS284: Designing for Science

    3 credits | year 4 | Technology & Social Innovation minor

    In this course, students will apply design thinking for data collection, for ways of communicating research findings, as well as designing strategies that use research insights to social problems. Students will use human-centred design methods to understand social problems, will explore public data sets, and collaborate with public, private, civil society, and research partners. With guidance from resource persons from the scientific and design communities, students will develop a practical understanding of data collection, of communicating research findings in ways appealing to the community, and how research insights can be used in problem solving.

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